Tools We Use

Here is a quick recap of our diverse research tools that are the backbones of much of our rigorous research work. 

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NEUROIMAGING: FMRI 

We use fMRI to understand the neural mechanisms that support memory retrieval and the way these mechanisms are implicated in other forms of retrieval, from planning to problem solving.

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eye tracking

We use eye tracking to capture how information is encoded and retrieved. With this tool, we can investigate how different states, like emotion or stress, influence memory functioning. 

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TemporaRY BRAIN LESIONS

We use brain stimulation techniques like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and well as beahvioural techniques that act like a 'cognitive lesion' to determine how removing certain brain processes affects performance on memory and related tasks like empathy. 

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BEHAVIOURAL TESTING

The basis of much of cognitive psychology is a strong experimental design. For many of our studies, we use behavioural testing to learn more about the mechanisms of memory and test new theories and models.

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PATIENT POPULATIONS

We test individuals with lesions to particular areas of their brain to get a better understanding of how these brain regions help us remember. We also hope this work with help direct future therapeutic decisions for the tested populations.

 

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INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES AND EXPERT POPULATIONS

Although it is well known that people recall memories in different ways, the exact mechanisms that underly these differences are not known. We test people in range in their ability to recover the past to discover these mechanisms. We also  test expert populations, such as people excel in imagery (e.g. visual artists) to see how these processes affect memory.